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Get your tickets here! Early bird tickets available- save $5 until May 22nd

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Ginger, Turmeric, Cinnamon

More and more research is supporting the idea that inflammation is at the heart of most chronic diseases.

A wonderful friend of mine taught me this delicious recipe for an anti-inflammatory tea.  She experienced significant reduction in her arthritis pain after regular consumption.  I decided I had to try it myself!  Not only is it extremely good for you, it is delicious!

Recipe?  In a saucepan full of water throw a few slices of fresh ginger, fresh turmeric, and cinnamon sticks.  Simmer for 20 min or longer.  Add  a small bit of honey and the juice of one lemon.   Drink hot or cold!  It is also easily made with dried, ground herbs as well.  Try 1 quart of water with 1/2 tsp of each herb.

Curcumin, the potent anti-oxidant in Turmeric has been found to be as effective an anti inflammatory as prescription non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in a trial with rheumatoid arthritis patients.  It is an effective free radical scavenger, and holds promise in prevention of cancer and alzheimer’s disease.  In nutrition, it seems that the deeper the color of the food the higher the nutritional value.  So when you are shopping, look for deep green greens like kale, dark berries, and bright yellow pigments like turmeric for nutrient dense power.

Ginger has been used traditionally to quell arthritis pain and has been shown effective in trials comparing it to NSAIDS.  Ginger is also a warming, digestive stimulant.

Cinnamon is rapidly earning its reputation as a blood sugar and lipid regulator for folks who struggle with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.  Besides this, cinnamon is also anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, warming and delicious!

Do you need any more encouragement to go put on a pot of water for a batch of turmeric, ginger, cinnamon tea?

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Would you like to clear away the sluggish fog of winter? The grey bloat of too many happy hours? Looking to shed a few pounds before summer? Lighten the load? Clean out the junk drawer? Are you experiencing any symptoms like

  • weight gain
  • fatigue
  • headaches
  • joint pain
  • depression, irritability, anxiety, mood swings
  • insomnia
  • bad breath
  • itchy skin
  • poor focus or memory
  • sinus congestion, allergies
  • constipation, gas, bloating

We live in an ever increasing toxic environment.  Causes of impaired detoxification can include:

  • Overwhelming load (exogenous-from outside the body, and endogenous-toxins generated by dysbiosis and leaky gut)
  • Impaired excretion (liver, bowel, kidney, lymph)
  • Inefficient fuels (improper macronutrient balance)
  • Deficiencies in micronutrients (antioxidants, cofactors for detox pathways)

You are in luck! Spring Detox Group starts April 10th!

Here’s the what’s and the how’s: 21 days of 2 shakes a day with some liver cleansing herbs and digestive enzymes. Plenty of protein(in the shakes- it’s non GMO pea protein) to support proper phase one and phase two detox. Modified, individualized elimination diet. Learn how to properly support your organs of elimination to avoid “detox symptoms.” People do very well on this program and generally feel energetic and clear headed. We will not be meeting in person this time, but there will be 3 live calls (recorded) for education and support. Those will be Sunday April 10, April 17th, and April 24th at 10 am PST. There will also be a private facebook group for members to share ideas, recipes, and ask questions.

The 21 day detox costs only $217. When consider the cost remember that you will be replacing 42 meals with the shakes, so think of all the money you will save on groceries!

Here’s a recorded call I did last fall explaining a bit about why seasonal detox is a wonderful way to support our health.

 

What others have said about the program:
 “We went to a gathering yesterday that represented the most outstanding baked goods we can eat loads of- chocolate shortbread cookies, sour cream coffeecake, arrays of cookies, ad nauseam. Honestly, after two weeks of choosing consciously what goes in the pie-hole, it wasn’t a big deal at all. I NEVER thought I’d feel that way. “I am weak; I can’t say no; diet is out of my control.” These are myths that it’s miraculous to discover.” CM

To join us email me with your interest at dr.rose@rosecabinetmedicine.com

 

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essential nourish

Four courses designed to nourish, educate, and stimulate your palate and your imagination. Each dish will showcase an essential oil with unique healing qualities.

Included is one cocktail or mocktail (with an essential oil, of course) and if you choose you may bring a bottle of wine or something else to share with your group.

The menu will be gluten free, and soy free, focusing on plenty of fresh vegetables, quality meats and fats, low in sugars. If you have individual food sensitivities please contact us and we can usually accommodate.

Please note, tickets are limited.

 

Get your Tickets HERE

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Please go to mobius microfarms to learn more about why to eat microgreens and how to get them!

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We had a bumper crop of collard greens this year in the garden. Even our dog was eating them!

Collards are super nutritious- high in vitamin A, vitamin K, and Folate. We use them as wraps for bread-less sandwiches (lightly steam them after removing the stem), stir fried with bacon, julienned in salads or as a noodle replacement. We eat a lot of soups in the winter time and I’m happy to have a supply of greens in the freezer. Pictured is julienned collards in green papaya salad.

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My husband is a teacher, and I spent so many years in school, and with kids going back to school, that late August will always feel like “back to school” time. We also have a lot of late August birthdays in our family. Right about now I start longing for more structure, fewer parties, more vegetables, fewer cocktails, more yoga, fewer late nights. Don’t get me wrong: I love our summers of fun! It’s just time for a correction. I know I am not alone in this shift! I am a big fan of self-care routines- which I didn’t realize were a “thing” these days. There are so many different ways we can “add health” to our daily routines it can easily become overwhelming. One way I manage the overwhelm is to make short term commitments to a routine- 30-40 days- and then re-evaluate. Do I love it? How do I feel? Did I notice a difference? Is it sustainable? Do I want to keep going or start a new routine?

My plan: 40 days of the same Kundalini kriya

New supplement routine focusing on immune support: Daily Nutrient Pack, extra Vitamin A, Vitamin D, Olive   Leaf, Reishi mushroom

In bed by 10 pm (or earlier)

Morning/Evening journaling using the structure of the 5 minute journal plus some exercises from Lynda Barry’s   Syllabus (which is my latest obsession)

 

Did you notice… one of my philosophies of health is that it is easier/better/more effective to ADD health to the system rather than take things AWAY. Notice I did NOT say, I’m going to cut out all sweets, alcohol etc. Or do an elimination diet. Or say NO to all social invitations. But the focus of my routine will help me find my way back to feeling centered, good in my body, rested, energized, all those things that naturally lead to making better decisions about when and how much to indulge.

I got the idea of a 30 day new “routine” from my niece Amelia when she was living in Portland, and also from Gretchen Rubin’s book The Happiness Project, which is also a great read and wonderful resource for embracing new healthier habits.

I’d love to hear about any “back to school” changes in routine that are working for you!

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KristyBioPic Kristy combines nutritional therapies, lifestyle education and counseling to assist her clients in achieving optimal health and wellbeing.  Having personal experience with a debilitating illness she appreciates how nutrition and wellness therapies support us in healing.  She is passionate about sharing her insights and expertise in cooking, nutrition, health, and mind-body therapies. 

Kristy holds a Master’s of Science degree in Holistic Nutrition.  She strongly believes in using food as medicine and that therapeutic diets should be satisfying and delicious.  She understands food is most therapeutic when it is organic, local, whole and enjoyed in community.  Kristy customizes therapeutic diets to each individual, depending on their specific tastes, belief systems and health needs. 

She is certified as an Embodied Life Teacher and believes that being present and feeling whole leads to healing.  Kristy earned her certification as a Feldenkrais Practitioner in 2007.  Kristy honed her skills in the kitchen at the upscale Berkeley restaurant Lalimes.   She now utilizes her cooking experience as a Therapeutic Chef for clients who are making dietary changes. 

Kristy’s focus is on supporting gastrointestinal health through nutrition and other therapies.  Healthy gut bacteria leads to vitality and wellness but an unhealthy gut can contribute to a variety of conditions such as SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth), obesity, diabetes and autoimmune conditions. 

Kristy offers a variety of specialized holistic wellness services and if you are interested, you can SCHEDULE HERE.

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If you have your finger on the pulse of what’s new in Natural Medicine you’ve probably heard about oil pulling.  Folks are talking about it, blogging about it, making you tube videos about it.  There is great debate about it.  Is it the magical cure-all or a complete waste of time?  But first of all what exactly IS oil pulling?

Oil pulling has its roots in Ayurvedic medicine but was made popular by Dr. F. Karach, M.D. in the 1990’s.  The technique involves taking 1 tablespoon of oil (most commonly cold pressed sesame, coconut or sunflower oil) into the mouth and vigorously swishing the oil through the teeth and gums for 20 minutes, then spitting it out and washing the mouth with water and brushing the teeth. The claim is that during this process toxins are pulled from the blood into the viscous oil and then expelled with the oil. There are many anecdotal claims on the internet that this practice not only is good for oral hygiene (cures gingivitis and bad breath, whitens teeth), but that it can cure chronic diseases such as blood disorders, arthritis, hormonal dysregulation, sinusitis, immune disorders and cancer.

Let’s face it:  I’m a sucker for crazy ritualized health routines.  I mean I have fully embraced the castor oil pack, dry skin brushing, jumping into cold water,eating organ meats, and more.  So when I first heard about oil pulling from an interview with Bruce Fife ND, I was intrigued!  Sign me up!  I’ll try it!  I could not think of any reason it would be a BAD idea to swish oil around your mouth.  If nothing else, perhaps we absorb some good fatty acids through the mucus membranes in our mouth.

I do know that our mouths often harbor plenty of bacteria on a good day, and on a bad day can be the source of ongoing, hidden infections that the body has to  continually fight off.    Having a low grade infection takes lots of energy to keep the immune system so revved up and can lead to further complications.   Coconut oil is especially antimicrobial, so there’s that.   With my training in physiology I can’t say that I buy into the idea that toxins are being “pulled” into the saliva/oil mixture through this process.  But I am the first to admit that there is a lot we don’t know about the human body and I don’t need to understand something for it to benefit me.  I mean, I practice homeopathy after all!

So I have been practicing oil pulling with coconut oil (I am a big fan of the many health benefits of coconut oil and I buy it here) and a few drops of On Guard Essential oil (from doTERRA which you can buy here).  Essential oils are some of the most potent antimicrobial agents (antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal), and have many antioxidant qualities as well. Adding essential oils to my oil pulling regime helps with bacteria in the mouth which cause tooth decay and inflammation.  I do it once a day, in the morning, on an empty stomach. The first thing I noticed was that my teeth feel like I just came from a dental cleaning appointment.  Smooth!  Clean!  Sexy!  I’m watching my receding gums and hoping to see a change there.  My chronic back and hip pain is improved (!).  I don’t suffer from allergies or chronic sinusitis, but I do feel my sinuses drain each time I do it.

I’m convinced it is a wonderful addition to my self-care routine.  Give it a try and tell me what you think!

References:

  • Asokan S, et al. Effect of oil pulling on halitosis and microorganisms causing halitosis: a randomized controlled pilot trial. J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent 2011; 29(2): 90-4.
  • Asokan S, et al. Effect of oil pulling on plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized, controlled, triple-blind study. Indian J Dent Res 2009; 20(1): 47-51.
  • Asokan S, et al. Effect of oil pulling on Steptococcus mutans count in plaque and saliva using Dentocult SM Strip mutans test: A randomized, controlled, triple-blind study. J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent 2008; 26(1): 12-17.
  • Asokan S, et al. Mechanism of oil-pulling therapy – in vitro study. Indian J Dent Res 2011; 22(1): 34-7.
  • Singh A, et al. Tooth brushing, oil pulling and tissue regeneration: A review of holistic approaches to oral health. J Ayurveda Integr Med 2011; 2(2): 64-8.

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Join me and Naturopathic doctor Josie Schmidt to learn about using essential oils to support your body’s detoxification pathways! We will cover who should cleanse, how, and why.  We will discuss the difference between a “cleanse” and a “detox.” Go home feeling inspired and informed!

Green Lemonade

Green Lemonade

Alberta Abbey

126 NE Alberta St

Portland OR 97211

7-9 PM April 13th 2015

If you cannot make the live event look here for the recorded webinar

a week or two after the live event.

 

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